Questions entretien Actuarial Analyst chez ProSight Specialty Insurance | Glassdoor.fr

Questions entretien Actuarial Analyst chez ProSight Specialty Insurance

Entretiens chez ProSight Specialty Insurance

3 Avis sur les entretiens

Expérience

Expérience
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Entretien de Actuarial Analyst

Candidat à l'entretien anonyme
Aucune offre d'embauche
Expérience neutre
Entretien dificile

Candidature

J'ai postulé en ligne. J'ai passé un entretien à ProSight Specialty Insurance.

Entretien

I had two phone interviews followed by a day of in-person interviews. Met with several people the day of the interview, all of whom were friendly and asked good questions.

Questions d'entretien d'embauche

Autres avis d'entretien pour ProSight Specialty Insurance

  1. Utile (1)  

    Entretien de Actuarial Analyst

    Candidat à l'entretien anonyme
    Offres d'embauche déclinées
    Expérience positive

    Entretien

    They were very enthusiastic and excited to show you everything about their new programs. An overall welcoming company who is excited to show you about themselves. They are new to the insurance world but will be a entity to fear in a couple of years.

    Questions d'entretien d'embauche


  2. Utile (7)  

    Entretien de Actuarial Analyst

    Candidat à l'entretien anonyme - Morristown, NJ (États-Unis)
    Aucune offre d'embauche
    Expérience négative
    Entretien dificile

    Candidature

    J'ai postulé via un recruteur. Le processus a pris 2 semaines. J'ai passé un entretien à ProSight Specialty Insurance (Morristown, NJ (États-Unis)).

    Entretien

    I've never been compelled to write a review after simply interviewing with a company, but my experience was so horrid I wanted to share. It seems my interview experience is on par with the reviews I'm reading regarding the culture the company.

    Immediately as I walked into their offices, I noticed an eerie feel to the place. I couldn't pinpoint it at the time, but as I went through the interview; it made more sense. My first interviewer was actually an awesome guy, definitely the sharpshooter of the group; he seemed quite intelligent and an overall good guy, and clearly the intellectual stud of the actuarial group.

    The negativity arose when I had to do a video interview with a member of their California offices. He was rude and negative out of the gate, saying things like, "Try to think", or asking me to go through step by step of large projects I did at my current job. This is a straight up awful interview question, as intense actuarial projects are best to be done while also taking notes; should I second person need to see what you did, but also so you don't forget. You cannot expect someone, in an interview situation, to take you through step by step of what you did.

    He also kept asking "why" to everything to the point where it was such an annoyance that I just told him that's what I was told to do. It was as if this man had never interviewed a person before. He seemed to enjoy yelling for no reason, you can always tell when someone is just trying to be annoying and yell at you without cause; which he was doing.

    He complained because I took a sitting off for my 4th exam and also felt the need to tell me I had no qualifications. You brought me in for an interview, dude, obviously I'm qualified. In his defense, after he made that remark, he did apologize to me; and after that point showed some remorse for his behavior.

    He obviously hadn't had much experience interviewing, saying things like; why do we need you if we already have so and so, what do you have that the other analyst's don't (like I know them or should talk negatively), clearly shows this man didn't have his head on straight.

    The funny thing is that after that interview with the video chat man, the man who would have been my manager interviewed me. He had about 6 years of experience, and, lo and behold, tells me he only had 4 exams passed. The kicker, I found out afterward his 3rd and 4th exams were LC and ST; which only count for 1 exam on the casualty side, so he was actually on the same level exam wise as me, who only had a year and some change of experience at the time. So I was yelled at for not sitting for an exam, but it doesn't seem any other actuaries are held to some sort of exam taking standard.

    I understand why he only had 3 though, as ProSight brags about having no employee manual; which in turn means they have no actuarial student program, which is deliberate. They do not want to be responsible for giving actuaries work study time, they only want to work you to the bone to make money; it seems the executive team wants to make money, and pushes their agenda by having no set rule book. On the job study time is vital to an actuary to pass exams, as you get upward of 100 hours of work study time for standard actuarial student programs.

    The last man who interviewed me was a freshly hired fellow, a nice guy, but also a poor interviewer. He asked me a question that forced me to talk about myself negatively. At that point, it was irrelevant, I knew I didn't want to work there.

    It's my understanding from reading employee reviews that the company is now up for sale, so it was a blessing in disguise that I had a bad experience and got no offer; as I received an offer a month later as a desirable company with work study hours and a positive environment.

    I've seen ProSight's commercial auto and Workers Comp indications, I figured that their grossly high loss ratio's on these lines would catch up with them; looks like it happened sooner than they thought.

    A lot of for-profit organizations are like this, management calls all the shots and pushes their agenda for their bonus. The man who would have been my manager told me ProSight's motto of actuaries is that if you are an actuary, the exams will eventually come. Not if you don't study for them.

    Questions d'entretien d'embauche

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