Avis sur Relativity | Glassdoor.fr

Avis sur Relativity

Dernière mise à jour : 15 mars 2019
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Andrew Sieja
54 Évaluations

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  1. « Outstanding So Far »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Relativity à plein temps (Moins d'un an)

    Avantages

    People are genuinely overall very friendly, legitimately care about their work, and are eager to teach and help you.

    Inconvénients

    Work from home is used frequently, and our space is already large, so sometimes floors feel empty.


  2. Utile (1)

    « Love the work, the people, the values »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Relativity à plein temps (Plus de 3 ans)

    Avantages

    -Smart People
    -Innovation is encouraged
    -Core Values are thoroughly embedded in how we work together, our performance reviews and how we interview candidates
    -Development opportunities
    -Leaders who care
    -Growing rapidly

    Inconvénients

    Sentiment of leadership or the feeling of work being balanced may vary based on department

    Conseils à la direction

    Continue to listen to your employees. You respond well when things come up and look to be proactive and leaders within the tech space. keep it up.

  3. Utile (1)

    « Great Culture and Training Budget »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Ancien employé - Technical Business Analyst - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Ancien employé - Technical Business Analyst - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    J'ai travaillé chez Relativity à temps plein (Plus de 5 ans)

    Avantages

    -Fun, rewarding culture
    -Smart, funny, helpful people
    -Generous training budget for conferences and certifications
    -Good benefits
    -Transparency about how the company is doing

    Inconvénients

    -Very developer/engineering focus, not enough product, creative, or user experience focused
    -Last minute changes in processes not communicated in a timely manner and/or not detailed enough


  4. Utile (1)

    « I absolutely love working here »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Administrative Assistant - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Employé actuel - Administrative Assistant - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Relativity à plein temps (Plus d'un an)

    Avantages

    The company is very transparent, growing quickly, and is really interesting. The people are nice, and very work-hard, play-hard. If you need help with something, people are really receptive to you and willing to spend time coaching you. The work space is really conducive to any working style: desks that you can sit or stand at; phone rooms; a zen room where you can lay down and take a nap; quiet work rooms where the only sound is the typing of keyboards. Coffee, soft drinks, tea, and fresh fruit provided every day. Fun events all the time such as the Valentine's day party, bake off, Halloween costume contest, etc. I believe in our mission and what we do. I feel our leadership promotes integrity in our work and that means a lot to me.

    Inconvénients

    Everyone is very ambitious and tends to bite off more work than we can chew.


  5. Utile (21)

    « A Brief History of Relativity »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Ancien employé - Employé anonyme
    Ancien employé - Employé anonyme
    Ne recommande pas
    Point de vue négatif
    Aucune opinion sur PDG

    J'ai travaillé chez Relativity à temps plein

    Avantages

    For the TLDR crowd: If you play your cards smart and with a little luck, you can work at Relativity and make Relativity work for you. You should consider a job at Relativity if:

    • You are entry-level and need your two years of experience. After that you may be able move on to a top-tier technology company or a startup and learn something beyond the basics.

    • You are an experienced professional looking for a challenge and don’t mind fighting dirty. The level of decorum of internal politics there is significantly below corporate average. Forewarned is forearmed.

    • You are a high roller with a Masters in Nothing (MBA) and want in on the potential IPO as a gamble to make a quick buck.

    Now the details:

    Relativity is not like any other company I have worked for. It has certainly been very successful: In my time there it more than doubled in size, the balance sheet up to recently has been solid, bonuses and raises every year. There are several contributing factors to that success, one of them that it was the first and may still be the only e-discovery vendor with a complete, end-to-end solution. Andrew Sieja, the CEO affectionately referred to as “Andrew” around the office, deserves full credit for coming up with this vision and executing on it. There is a great hunger for success, and while there’s arguably not a lot of organizational sophistication or engineering brilliance about Relativity, they are scrappy, they do whatever it takes and have become quite good at winning ugly.

    Andrew obviously strives for that charismatic, larger-than-life tech CEO persona. He is genuine and even likable, a quirky combination of nerdiness and dominant alpha-male aggression. With his first-generation Eastern European immigrant background, he knows how to have fun and throw a good party, and you’d better have fun too, or at least make a good-faith effort to look like you are. Doing shots with the CEO is how careers can be made (or broken) at Relativity.

    The dreaded and controversial RCA (Relativity Certified Administrator) exam, which gets a bad rep in many Glassdoor reviews, is the condition of employment for many of the departments. It actually does contribute to the company’s success by ensuring that new employees have at least some understanding of the product. The urban legend has it that if you score 96% or above on the exam, you get a steak dinner with Andrew himself. And Relativity’s emphasis on hiring out of college allows them to squeeze a healthy profit margin out of cheap hires.

    There’s also a cool location in the Bank of America Building downtown Chicago, free LaCroix and expensive coffee, lavish parties, lots of alcohol at company events, and a generous education budget for professional development, conferences, etc. There are still remnants of startup culture (like whiskey bottles on developers’ desks) and plenty of youthful energy - brash, roguish, crass, and boozy. There is genuine camaraderie of people in different stages of their careers pulling off all-nighters to figure out production problems together. And hackathons are fun.

    Inconvénients

    Where do we begin?

    If I were to concisely define Relativity’s main problem, it would be a lack of quality in leadership. Behind their perfect, diversity-balanced, color-coordinated advertising copy is a fundamental deficit of hard skills, creativity, and competence that goes all the way to the top.

    Glassdoor reviews here that characterize Relativity as an architectural disaster are not far from the truth. All signs point to the fact that they have lost the technology arms race to the likes of Logikcull and Everlaw. As talented an entrepreneur as he is, Andrew hasn’t been an engineer for a very long time, but for many years he maintained the CTO role. It is no secret that Relativity’s ancient core codebase doesn’t work very well in modern cloud infrastructure, and it is in large part due to Andrew’s meddling, haphazard decision-making, constant changes of direction, cutting corners, and taking liberties with product quality. Rather than modernize the architecture, he kept throwing more bodies at problems, and over the last five or so years doubled the size of the Product Development department and the number of engineering teams with hires out of college (not to mention contractors all over the globe). Andrew has yet to learn to accept the people who can stand up to him: In my time at Relativity, I saw at least two strong technologists who could have provided the badly needed leadership fired or forced out.

    In daily life, Relativity’s quality problems translate into overtime and stress. Engineering teams have to assign people for on-call duty to deal with production issues, which is no fun if you have a family. And bi-weekly product demos where Andrew can rip into your work in front of the whole company are a miserable ordeal for tech leads, development managers, and PMs alike. All that said, as a far as quality of life and workplace culture, Product Development is by far the healthiest part of Relativity. Things are a lot worse in other departments.

    Case in point: Support organization. It started as a call center and never evolved out of it. The culture is predicated on control, obedience, and butt kissing, making it a sad oppressive mess. Stay away. That includes positions in support, training, and documentation.

    Human Resources: In my opinion, the most problematic area. The review process is hopelessly broken because it is largely based on the manager’s subjective evaluation of how well you adhere to “core values”; never mind your material contributions to the business. Disputing an unfair review or brining up bad management is a lost cause. Hiring process is broken too, they don’t know what to do with good fortune when it falls in their lap: I have seen a number of times when they went on months’ long candidate searches while already having supremely qualified candidates in-house. The “Referral Madness” is exactly that – madness. And then there’s just a plain lack of basic oversight: “Values” are great, but how about providing leadership by gently introducing some common-sense standards of conduct and tempering office shenanigans? That is what one would expect from Human Resources. Instead, there is grandstanding while engaging in retaliation, playing politics, and covering up the problems. With HR practices like that, the place is going nowhere. And in the “Me Too” era, it could well be ripe for scandal and lawsuits. Hopefully no one gets hurt.

    Conseils à la direction

    None. Based on years of observations, there isn’t the learning ability in the senior leadership (possibly with the exception of Andrew) to take the company to the next level. For that reason, dispensing free advice here is an exercise in futility: That bunch already got it made, they know everything there is to know, and their professed culture of feedback is a joke. They don’t listen, and they seem to have a very feudal notion of leadership as personal fiefdom, an entitlement with no responsibility. But there are lot of good people at Relativity trying to make a living. I wish them well. If the company got acquired, more thoughtful leadership may be able to use its market share and size advantage to buy the time needed to transform it from its current dubious state into a real technology leader and a quality workplace.

    Réponse de Relativity

    11 janv. 2019 – Chief Executive Officer

    Thank you for sharing a detailed overview of your perspective.

    We’re in the middle of a multi-year transition of both our business and software delivery model to SaaS, and we’re working to... Voir plus


  6. Utile (4)

    « Silicon Valley type of software company in Chicago »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Relativity à plein temps (Plus de 5 ans)

    Avantages

    Cutting edge, big data platform, cool company culture, nice comfortable, open office with stand up desks, great benefits, week off between Christmas and New Year's Day

    Inconvénients

    Can be too picky with hiring standards sometimes

    Conseils à la direction

    Continue to innovate on the platform and branch into new areas which can use Relativity; focus more on diversity and inclusion to bring in new talent


  7. « Great place to work »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Employé actuel - Employé anonyme - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Relativity à plein temps (Plus de 8 ans)

    Avantages

    Flexible work hours. Opportunity to work from home in certain roles. Open communication from leadership. Lots of opportunities to be involved in social activities within the organization. Great benefits and decent pay.

    Inconvénients

    Your vacation time starts off quite generous but the acquirement of additional days off is slow.

    Conseils à la direction

    You've invested a lot of time and effort in improving the work/life balance for your employees and it's greatly appreciated. Continue to work hard on preserving our collaborative and supportive corporate culture. The quality of work brings people in, but it's the quality people that keeps people here.

  8. « Great place to work »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Program Manager - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Employé actuel - Program Manager - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Relativity à plein temps (Plus de 5 ans)

    Avantages

    Good work from home support
    Transparency in what is happening
    Detailed communication from the top
    Opportunities are real
    Pay is good but negotiate hard
    Positive atmosphere when the jr employees are not whining
    Good benefits

    Inconvénients

    Many new employees who don't know how good they have it. First jobbers, quit whining about everything. Constructive criticism is useful, whining,...no.
    Become experts in the technology we have and use it
    HR is weak and inexperienced. Learn how to work with all employees young, middle and older. Dorie cannot do everything.

    Conseils à la direction

    Andrew, Nick, George, other VP's. Take a few hours each month and sit with a few employees you don't know. Have them tell you what they do and how it helps the company. Encourage them. Thank them. Don't let the size of the company distance you.


  9. « Best Place to Work »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Employé actuel - Performance Engineer - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Employé actuel - Performance Engineer - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue positif
    Approuve le PDG

    Je travaille chez Relativity à plein temps (Plus d'un an)

    Avantages

    Best Place to Work; Good work life balance

    Inconvénients

    Nothing that I could think of


  10. Utile (13)

    « Once & Future greatness at this firm »

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Équilibre travail/vie privée
    • Culture et valeurs
    • Opportunités de carrière
    • Rémunération et avantages
    • Dirigeants
    Ancien employé - Senior Manager - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Ancien employé - Senior Manager - Chicago, IL (États-Unis)
    Recommande
    Point de vue neutre
    Approuve le PDG

    J'ai travaillé chez Relativity à temps plein (Plus d'un an)

    Avantages

    PROS:
    + Great people
    + Best office space ever
    + Pretty flat org chart
    + Liberal WFH policy
    + Good hardware / software choices & desks
    + The boutique player in a niche market
    + Not yet public

    Not for everyone, as evidenced by the incredible range of opinions here, as well as by the fairly high turnover rate for employees. I can relate because this is one of the coolest places I’ve ever worked and one of the most frustrating. Relativity thinks of itself as entrepreneurial tech startup with a Midwestern (Chicago) flare, and in many ways that’s the TL;DR. At nearly 800 people it’s starting to feel the growing pains of typical companies at this stage in their development. The bright and visionary founder & CEO can (and does) change courses with the wind, and will expect the company to follow suit at light speed.
    Relativity is very deliberate about their culture including one not listed directly in their hallowed core values: A culture of feedback. This is so much a part of the company that many of the older critiques listed by others seem to describe a company other than the one I currently work for, proof that the company has heard the complaints and acted on them. Examples:
    • Complaint: Work From Home (WFH) is discouraged, frowned upon, etc.
    o Actuality: On any given day, it seems half the company is WFH. On my own team of 18 people, I had 7 people that worked remotely more often than in the office.
    • Complaint: Lack of diversity amongst employees
    o Actuality: I’ve worked in a huge public university system, the US Government, a manufacturer, and trading firms, and this is the most diverse place I’ve worked in forty years. Also, they define “diversity” quite broadly. It’s a true strength of the firm. Research suggests that firms either “talk about diversity”, or live it. Relativity lives it, but I am a little worried because of late, they’ve begun to talk about it as well. 
    • Complaint: “Amateur hour”.
    o Actuality: I had to laugh at this one a bit because I get it. Where other tech firms want to hire the smartest guy in the room; Relativity will only make room for that person if he / she (I am paraphrasing the company owner) “is not a ” […~jerk]. Rather, they hire smart, motivated people who appreciate & live the core values, and provide an environment where they can succeed. Some fresh grads, others industry vets.

    The Chicago HQ has the coolest office spaces I’ve ever been in (much less worked in): Every desk is adjustable to stand or sit; they provide great hardware & software for employees; there are deep window sills you can actually sit on, or put your teams books or cool artifacts on; four “break-out areas” on each of the four floors and several “pantries” stocked with fresh fruit, soft-drinks, tea & coffee and tons of VC enabled conference rooms and large training areas. The main cafeteria has ping-pong, old school video games and there’s a “Zen room” for napping ( / meditating / …). What you won’t see are hard (desktop) phones. IT encourages the use of one or more soft-phone applications instead, with mixed results. The building is remodeling the lobby so there are issues with badging in, hopefully soon to be resolved. Hopefully they bring some of the restaurants back too. There’s a 23rd floor rooftop deck and a gym with a $50 lifetime membership
    The people are awesome; particularly the C* level folks, each of them extremely driven, competent, and yet very approachable. The individual contributors too, to a person, are very helpful, positive, hard-working, and thirsty for knowledge and success.

    Inconvénients

    CONS:
    - Thinly staffed compared to expectations of growth, change
    - Long & risky onboarding times
    - Extremely fast rate of change, often for change’s sake, often without breathing to see if the last change actually worked
    - Obsession with metrics: often inaccurate, duplicative, and contradictory
    - Very high turnover, and not everyone leaves of their own accord

    It’s the middle management that needs help: the Director / Sr. Manager folks need to find time to talk to each other it seems.

    Anecdotes:
    • I got an email / text / call from a Director (or higher) complaining that a square on “the dashboard” is red, or the number too high (or low). What dashboard, you may ask? I did. I was pointed to one I had not known about, nor had my team been told about it, trained on it, or had any input in creating it. This was not a one off, but happened at least a half-dozen times with different dashboards (in one case a spreadsheet) and different higher-ups. I would have to reverse-engineer the genesis of the “bad mark” across multiple teams and technologies. Only occasionally would this be indicative of an actual issue or problem my team or another internal team could move the needle on. Many dashboards are duplicative and at time contradictory.
    The company is obsessed with metrics (in fairness, the mission statement begins “Organize Data…”) and “dashboards” which more often than not are really “reports” (i.e. not real-time) but they are often. Unfortunately, this level of scrutiny surveillance does not help build trust.

    • The “culture of feedback” leads some to ignore the “tell-me-first” rule: If you have a problem, please let me know first, so I can help better meet (or at least properly set) your expectations. There’s a veteran director who sat in the office adjacent to mine, but would regularly send emails to large (e.g. 150 people) distribution lists calling out perceived short-comings of my team, and this would be my (and the team’s) first exposure to the incident in question. My boss kindly forwarded an email from a guy I hadn’t yet met complaining about my lack of ownership over a problem which was completely beyond my control. One of the CIO’s new hires and rising stars sent an email to her boss about what she perceived as my lack of engagement on a project, …. She personally never mentioned this to me before or since, nor frankly, did the CIO except to copy me to an email to my boss (accidentally, I think) describing the dire consequences.

    • I do not feel “entitled” to free coffee provided by my employer, but will certainly take them up on the offer. The old single-serve machines were nearly all removed and replaced with much larger, fancier machines with touch-screens and cappuccino and multiple choices… I applauded this because I always felt guilty about the environmental cost of k-cups, but … it happened without any announcement or fanfare, and the newer machines were less reliable and would have messages on the touchscreen saying “Swab the foredeck”, or whatever, but the error state had no instructions on how to do that. Again, not complaining about free coffee (we could be discussing release names), but providing a metaphor with how frenetic change was managed (or not) and communicated throughout the company.
    Despite the accelerated pace of change, there are a few sacred cows:
    • Goofy team names. (Teams name themselves arbitrary things, so it’s hard to get help on e.g. the fubar component because the responsible team is called El Duderino or somesuch.

    • The RCA rite of passage. On the footnote of an addendum to your offer letter will be a clause that says something like “As a condition of your employment you will be required to pass the Relativity Certified Administrator exam with a score of 80% or more. You will be given 60 days to do so.” You’ll get three shots at it and they’ll sequester you away from your group so that they’re paying you for theoretically doing nothing but studying for this notoriously difficult exam. If you don’t pass, they let you go. (This is not really highlighted during the interview process, as you might imagine.) When your teams are already very thinly staffed, and you know that best case (i.e. you already know the ideal candidate to replace someone who quit today, and he/she happens to be available immediately) you’re still more than 30 days away from having someone in the seat, you have zero incentive to manage low performers out.

    Do be careful when you decide to leave: Have your t’s crossed and I’s dotted: Your last day is when health coverage ends, not EOM. They will tell you money in your transit FSA will buy you that least train ticket, but it won’t,etc.

    At the end of the day, I am glad for the time I spent at this unique firm, and most especially for the great folks and some interesting technology I got to work with there. I always had the feeling that the place “Used to be a great firm”, or “Could one day be a great firm” once they get past these growing pains.

    Conseils à la direction

    Now that you've got the right C* suite & VP level folks in place for sure, listen to them and act quickly to right the ship.

    Replace some of the metrics with a more human touch. (Verify yes, but build a little trust first). At very least have someone own (at least document) the data flow for these metrics so that folks held responsible know what they mean. In the same way you have five people creating security tickets for every one person resolving them, provide more resources for the folks fixing the red squares on the dashboards.

    Socialize the “tell me first” rule: before you complain about someone publicly, or to their boss’s boss, at least mention the issue to the defendant(s).

    Lose the silly team names once & for all.

    Make the following required reading for all managers:
    • The Speed of Trust
    • StrengthsFinder
    • Fake Work

    Add some collaboration & communication in between Innovate ... Execute (at the speed of light!), and the company will have the bright future it deserves.

    Réponse de Relativity

    4 déc. 2018 – Chief People Officer

    Thanks very much for taking the time to share your thoughts on a range of subjects in such detail. Your input will help us continue creating the future our community of customers and Relativians... Voir plus